Below are some blog posts and web pages from the past week that I want to be sure to share. What bookmarkable finds have you made recently?

From The Writer Magazine: Those Pesky Day Jobs

You need to be a registered member of The Writer online to read “Why I Don’t Want to Quit My Day Job,” but registration is free and The Writer content is top-notch.

“[I]n our April issue, Jacob M. Appel, a doctor and prolific short-story writer, argues that a day job can actually provide you with rich material for your writing.” Read More

From the article:

“Every writing instructor, at some point, is asked: ‘Should I write what I know or what I don’t know?’ I prefer to tell my students, ‘Write what you know and what nobody else knows.’ For many of them, that means the knowledge and wisdom acquired in practicing podiatry or commercial litigation, or running a cheese shop.”

And…

“This is the future of creative writing, I believe: Not a handful of trained professionals churning out prose like Dahl’s Great Automatic Grammatizator, but millions of ordinary people, scribbling their secrets behind pharmacy counters and in firehouses and at interstate truck stops, trying to capture the magic of a diverse and ever-changing world.”

Amen, Mr. Appel.


100-Word Flash Fiction Piece

I really like Pam Parker’s 100-word flash fiction story today: “Waiting.” It stopped me cold.


9 Don’t-Miss Creativity & Writing Posts

The Artist’s Road’s Patrick Ross shares his well-chosen Creativity Tweets of the Week, including one for “5 Blog Posts Every Artist Should Write” (available in English and Italian!)


Poem in Your Pocket for Young Poets: 100 Poems to Rip Out & Read

The Academy of American Poets is offering a book of 100 detachable poems, perfect for reading, folding, and keeping in one’s pocket during Poem in Your Pocket Day and all of National Poetry Month (April). (Or use the idea for inspiration to make your own.)


How Many of These Poetry Books Do You Own?

Also to help us gear up for National Poetry Month, take a look at Oprah’s list of 20 Books of Poetry Everyone Should Own. The list offers an excellent starting place for anyone who wants to add more poetry to his or her life, whether you buy the books or head to your local library.