Today’s photo doesn’t match the poem, except that it was taken in South Dakota and, given the winter we’ve just had, I thought it would be interesting to see how farmers fed their livestock in heavy snow in 1940.

The poetry prompt for today is to write an Anacreontic poem, which is usually about love and wine and akin to a drinking song. Given that Hattie was not much of a drinker, I’ve adapted her entries for April 9 and April 11, 1922 using very loose Anacreontic verse (seven syllables per line) for a kind of anti-Anacreontic poem. Hattie and Will would have been married only four years in 1922 and living near Spencer, Nebraska. The funeral in Ponca was over 100 miles to the east.

April 11, 1922: Hubby Says No!

Uncle Jim Herman fell down
stairs on Sunday and broke his
neck, was buried today at
Ponca Cemetery. My
duty to go but hubby
says No! and so No! it was.

Team of seventeen-year-old mares pulling a load of hay, 1940 (Public Domain, BIA, ARC Identifier: 285298)

Team of seventeen-year-old mares pulling a load of hay, 1940 (Public Domain, BIA, ARC Identifier: 285298)

April 9, 1922

April 9, 1922

April 11, 1922

April 11, 1922